Pamphilius pallipes - Drab Spinner

Records are distributed widely north to the Great Glen. Reports of this species have declined over a longer time period with only a few records between 1991 and 2020 (Musgrove, 2022).

Female: The head is mottled black and yellow and the thorax is black with a yellow pattern dorsally. Abdomen may be almost entirely black above but often with the midline of tergites 4 and 5 brownish and the apical tergite yellow. Occasionally the abdomen is almost entirely brown above. The stigma is brownish-yellow.

Male: The head is patterned with black and yellow and the abdomen is black with the midline of tergites 4 and 5 brown and brown lateral faces.

Pamphilius pallipes larvae feed in twist-like leaf rolls of birch leaves.

Jump to other Pamphiliidae

Size: Male: 7 - 11mm, Female: 8 - 12mm

GB IUCN Status: Near Threatened
GB Rarity Status: Nationally Rare

Distribution: England, Scotland, Wales, Ireland

Flight period: May to June

Plant associations: Betula spp. (birches) including Betula pubescens (Downy Birch), Betula pendula (Silver Birch). Also rarely Alnus viridis (Green Alder)

References:

Benson, R.B., 1952. Handbooks for the Identification of British Insects. Hymenoptera, Symphyta, Vol 6, Section 2(a-c), Royal Entomological Society, London

Liston A, Knight G, Sheppard D, Broad G, Livermore L (2014) Checklist of British and Irish Hymenoptera - Sawflies, ‘Symphyta’. Biodiversity Data Journal 2: e1168. https://doi.org/10.3897/BDJ.2.e1168

Musgrove, A.J. 2022. A review of the status of sawflies of Great Britain - Phase 1: families other than Tenthredinidae. Natural England, unpublished

Schedl, W., 1976. Untersuchungen an Pflanzenwespen (Hymenoptera: Symphyta) in der subalpinen bis alpinen Stufe der zentralen ötztaler Alpen (Tirol, Österreich). Im Kommissionsverlag der Oesterreichischen Kommissionsbuchhandlung.

Viitasaari, M. ed., 2002. Sawflies (Hymenoptera, Symphyta), I: a review of the suborder, the Western Palaearctic taxa of Xyeloidea and Pamphilioidea. Tremex Press.